Spetacular beaches on the Isle of Lewis, Photo courtesy of Ken Kennedy (Image credit: http://www.hebrideanselfcateringholidays.com)

Spetacular beaches on the Isle of Lewis, Photo courtesy of Ken Kennedy

The largest of the Outer Hebridean islands, The Isle of Lewis is rich in ancient sites, offering excellent conditions for surfing and kayaking around its north and west coast. Easily reached via flights from Edinburgh, Aberdeen, Inverness and Glasgow running to Stornoway Airport, the island also has inter-flights between Benecula and Stornoway and is served by a regular ferry service from Ullapool, with a journey time of two and a half hours.

A relatively low lying Isle and one half of the Outer Hebrides, Lewis is the northern half and Harris the south. You'll find Gaelic still widely spoken here on the Western Isles together with magnificent ancient monuments and sites around Calanais. Visitors should note that public transport is limited on the Isle of Lewis, so it's well worth considering hiring a car.  Car hire is widely available at Stornoway Airport and in island capital Stornoway.

Ancient Sites & Attractions on the Lewis Coast - photo courtesy of Ken Kennedy (Image credit: http://www.hebrideanselfcateringholidays.com)

Ancient Sites & Attractions on the Lewis Coast - photo courtesy of Ken Kennedy

Enjoy a host of outdoor activities on the Isle of Lewis, particularly sea kayaking and surfing, with best surfing spots including Cliff Beach and the Point of Ness on the northern tip of the island. Most of the island's population is based in Stornaway, so you'll find the countryside here remote and peaceful, with a choice of coastal trails, woodland walks or treks across the interior's moorland bog where you're likely to see red deer, golden eagles and corncrakes.

Explore the ancient crafts of the Isle of Lewis at Crofting Blackhouse villages and museums including The Gearrannan and Arnol Blackhouse Villages on the north coast. Essential visiting are the ancient Calanais Callanish Standing Stones, a cluster of prehistoric and Iron Age sites right in the heart of Lewis near Loch Roag.

Callanish Stones - photo courtesy of Ken Kennedy (Image credit: http://www.hebrideanselfcateringholidays.com)

Callanish Stones - photo courtesy of Ken Kennedy

There are fifty stones in all arranged in what looks like the pattern of Celtic cross from the air. The standing stones date from around 3,000BC and around Calanais sit a selection of other standing stone sites. Find the Calanais Callanish stones with adjacent visitor centre clearly signposted off the A858. Soak up the Isle of Lewis' ancient landscape, rich in prehistoric standing stones, outdoor activities and offering the ultimate rural retreat. Find places to stay on the Isle of Lewis online now. 

Accommodation on Isle of Lewis

  • Isle of Lewis
    Sleeps 8
    Prices from
    £345
    Per week (seasonal) Sleeps 8
    TripAdvisor traveller rating from 6 reviews
    Rating from 6 reviews
    Beautifully presented 3 bedroom holiday home on the Isle of Lewis, just 10 minutes from Stornoway with spectacular sea views. Beach 1 minute walk. Free WiFi & digital TV. Sleeps 8.
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  • Isle of Lewis
    Sleeps 7
    Prices from
    £590
    Per week (seasonal)
    TripAdvisor traveller rating from 14 reviews
    Rating from 14 reviews
    A self catering croft house situated in the small hamlet of Crowlista on the Isle of Lewis, close to Uig Sands in the Outer Hebrides. Sleeps 7 in 4 bedrooms. Views of the Atlantic
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  • Isle of Lewis
    Sleeps 8
    Prices from
    £400
    Per week, sleeps 8 - (per night negotiable)
     
    Large self catering house on the Isle of Lewis ideal for a family holiday near Stornoway with extensive gardens, BBQ, Broadband internet access and car parking. Sleeps 8.
     
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