Dunnottar Castle, near Stonehaven (Image credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/black_friction/5155730925/)

Dunnottar Castle, near Stonehaven

The North East coast of Scotland comprises the vast coastline of Aberdeenshire and Moray, and the Angus coastline round Dundee and Montrose.

What's it like?

The arrival of North Sea oil in the 1960s led to the massive increase in prosperity for the North East, especially Aberdeen. From Aberdeen’s steely high granite buildings, to prehistoric sites, castles, fishing villages and productive agricultural land, the North East coast’s features are a pull for visitors.

Stonehaven (Image credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/allys_scotland/4725588756/)

Stonehaven

Beaches and Fishing VIllages

Dramatic cliffs atop sandy coastlines predominate – as at Bullers o’Buchan just South of Peterhead. Taking a look at any map of the North East coastline you’ll discover it crammed full of intimate, sheltered bays, for example at Rattray Head and Sandend. Banff and Portsoy fit the bill for a traditional seaside holiday, while Peterhead Lido, Collieston and Broad Haven beaches are worth a visit. Fraserburgh – a three-mile-long crescent shaped beach full of golden sands, is very popular, as is the wide bay of Findhorn.

Combine beach days with visits to traditional fishing towns such as Peterhead, Fraserburgh and Stonehaven, and your holiday comes alive! And why not immerse yourself in the local fishing atmosphere and sample some Cullen Skink – a local smoked haddock and potato soup – in this area famous for seafood, or try an Aberdeen Rowie – a flaky bread/pastry?

HMS Discovery, Dundee (Image credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/vickyb/6286988922/)

HMS Discovery, Dundee

History

The North East coastline has more than its fair share of fascinating historic places to visit - from the community of Catholic Benedictine monks near Elgin at Pluscarden Abbey (the only working medieval monastery in Britain), to the eighteenth century Duff House near Banff - a mansion with grounds and extensive artwork collection.
A personal favourite is the ruined Dunnottar Castle, South of Stonehaven, perched imposingly on rocks, sea crashing beneath. Wonderfully atmospheric, whatever the weather, it can be reached from Stonehaven Harbour’s coastal path. Dunnottar comes from the word ‘Dun’, Pictish for ‘hill fort’ – and yes, even now, the spirit of a “green lady” is seen here, apparently looking for her lost children – the Christian converts. Fyvie Castle near Turriff also has a haunted reputation. And for potent and fascinating history, you can’t find better than The Discovery (the ship that Captain Scott took to discover Antarctica), docked at Discovery Quay in Dundee.

How to get there

Most of the North East coast is navigated via the A90 – the coastal road round the entire East part of the coastline. In Fraserburgh, at the North East tip, the A98 takes over as coastal road to move inland parallel to the Moray Firth. Another major A road in the area, the A96, leads from the coast further inland through Inverurie and Huntly. Access to the UK’s main motorway network is via the M90 at Perth (just a little South West of Dundee).

Where to stay

We are proud to offer a wonderful choice of holiday cottages, hotels and other accommodation for discerning visitors to the North East coast. Whether you’re looking for a beach-side apartment and sea views, a caravan park, holiday lodge, hotel or pub, we offer a large variety of properties for your break. Many can be booked for one night only – why not investigate a coast walking holiday, staying with us throughout your break? See below for more information.

Accommodation in North East Scotland

  • Lossiemouth
    Sleeps 8
    Prices from
    £276
    per week (seasonal)
     
    Family fun holiday park near Lossiemouth overlooking the Moray Firth dolphin coast with an indoor pool, bar, restaurant and live entertainment. Static caravans and camping.
     
    Call
  • Strachan
    Prices from
    £28
    Per person, per night (4 people sharing)
     
    Delightful B&B in the heart of the Scottish countryside, overlooking River Feugh. Free WiFi and onsite parking, and a great restaurant and licensed bar. Rooms sleep 2-4 people.
     
    Call
  • Auchenblae
    Sleeps 4
    Prices from
    £160
    per apartment per night (sleep 2-4)
    TripAdvisor traveller rating from 13 reviews
    Rating from 13 reviews
    Attractive converted stables in a quiet wooded glen adjacent to Drumtochty Castle, a 20 minute drive from Stonehaven with free WiFi, parking and stunning gardens and grounds.
    TripAdvisor traveller rating from 13 reviews
    Rating from 13 reviews
    star
    star
    star
    star
    no star
    Rating
    Call