Tarbert, on Kintyre (Image credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/craiglea/9269370061/)

Tarbert, on Kintyre

The Kintyre peninsula in the West of Scotland is a long and narrow mainland island of about 30 miles in length. The Western Isle of Arran is to its East and Gigha to its West.

What’s Kintyre Like?

Kintyre is a mainland island – the only one in Scotland, and is therefore a little isolated, with scenery more redolent of an island than the mainland. With fertile coastal areas (including coastal peaks such as Torr Morr), and a hilly central area, this part of Scotland was settled by Vikings and Norsemen. The main economy of Kintyre is based around fishing and farming and Kintyre’s main town, Campbeltown is an ancient settlement at the inlet to the Cambeltown loch.

Features of Kintyre

Kintyre’s worldwide fame is for whisky production (boasting around 34 distilleries), and Campbeltown produces some of the most highly esteemed malt whisky in the world.

For walkers and cyclists, the Kintyre way explores this peninsula, taking in fishing villages, beaches, coves and gentle hills.

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Kintyre is also a great area for those visitors curious about historic and prehistoric structures. Many of the buildings and ruins are of historic interest – some medieval, some 19th century. Some of the churches, for example, Clachan Church and St Columba’s 13th century chapel, display beautiful and ancient carved grave slabs - and there are a massive number of standing stones (at least 34), a cairn or two and iron age forts at Clachan to the far North West.

The history of this area simply screams at visitors for attention. For example, the ruined castle in the attractive fishing village of Tarbert overlooks a natural harbour and claims much history with Robert the Bruce, as Hebridean sheep graze nearby. The Kintyre peninsula is a glorious location, even without the history, with stunning views to Gigha to the West and across the Kilbrannan Sound to Arran on the East.

How to get to Kintyre

The Kintyre peninsula is accessible by ferry, road or air. Regular ferry and air services to other Hebridean islands are available, but there is no rail service on the peninsula. The A83 is the main road which sweeps you down almost the full length of the west side of the peninsula to Campbeltown - past the Isle off Gigha and past the McAlister Clan visitor centre. On the East side of the peninsula, the B842 takes the visitor to the chapel and castle at Skipness, and to Caradale house.

Where to stay in Kintyre

Why not stay with us while walking the Kintyre way? Or visiting the Kintyre peninsula for a relaxing holiday in the great outdoors? Our accommodation is wonderfully suitable for holidays with family or pets, so take a look at our holiday cottages and guest houses for a stay to remember in this beautiful area. See below for more inspiration.

Accommodation in Kintyre

  • Ford by Lochgilphead   (40.4 miles from the centre of Kintyre)
    Sleeps 6
    Prices from
    £170
    Per week (Seasonal)
     
    An idyllic location with stunning views of Kilmichael Glen can be enjoyed at this little self catering holiday cottage & caravan, set amongst 1200 acres of land. Sleeps 6 in each.
     
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  • Ardfern   (44.1 miles from the centre of Kintyre)
    Sleeps 4
    Prices from
    £285
    Per week (seasonal), sleeps 4
     
    This semi-detached cottage is situated four miles from the coastal village of Ardfern in Scotland and sleeps four people in two bedrooms.
     
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  • Knocknaha   (14.5 miles from the centre of Kintyre)
    Sleeps 11
    Prices from
    £406
    Per week (seasonal), sleeps 11
    TripAdvisor traveller rating from 2 reviews
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    This large, six bedroom property close to Campbeltown in Scotland is able to sleep up to 11 people.
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    Rating from 2 reviews
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